“The Chief Shepherd”

One of the problems of blogging at night is that you might fall sound asleep on the couch while your brother is using the computer, thereby rendering your powers of composition useless, so you decide to go to bed when he wakes you up at 12:30. Therefore, here is what I would have posted yesterday, had I been alert enough to do so.

By far, the most familiar reference to the Lord as our Shepherd is Psalm 23:

1 The LORD is my shepherd; I shall not want.
2 He makes me lie down in green pastures.
He leads me beside still waters.
3 He restores my soul.
He leads me in paths of righteousness
for his name’s sake.

 4 Even though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death,
I will fear no evil,
for you are with me;
your rod and your staff,
they comfort me.

 5 You prepare a table before me
in the presence of my enemies;
you anoint my head with oil;
my cup overflows.
6 Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me
all the days of my life,
and I shall dwell in the house of the LORD
forever.

(As I write, I’m listening to a beautiful recording of this psalm, sung by Bryn Terfel.)

The earliest reference to the Lord as a shepherd is in Genesis 48. Many of the patriarchs were shepherds, and as he is blessing Joseph, Israel acknowledges God as “the God who has been my shepherd all my life long to this day” (verse 15).

Later, in chapter 49, as he blesses each son, Israel recalls the shepherd imagery and says Joseph was aided by the Shepherd,

“The archers bitterly attacked him,
shot at him, and harassed him severely,
24 yet his bow remained unmoved;
his arms were made agile
by the hands of the Mighty One of Jacob
(from there is the Shepherd, the Stone of Israel),
25 by the God of your father who will help you,
by the Almighty who will bless you
with blessings of heaven above”

In Psalm 28, David prays that God would continue to guide His people as a good shepherd, “Oh, save your people and bless your heritage! Be their shepherd and carry them forever.”

Asaph also addresses God in this way in Psalm 80:

1 Give ear, O Shepherd of Israel,
you who lead Joseph like a flock.
You who are enthroned upon the cherubim, shine forth.
2 Before Ephraim and Benjamin and Manasseh,
stir up your might
and come to save us!

 3 Restore us, O God;
let your face shine, that we may be saved!

In one of the most tender expressions of God’s care for His people, we read in Isaiah 40 that the Almighty God will “tend his flock like a shepherd; he will gather the lambs in his arms; he will carry them in his bosom, and gently lead those that are with young: (verse 11).

The shepherd imagery is used extensively throughout Ezekiel 34 as Ezekiel prophesies against the shepherds over the flock of Israel: Several times in this chapter, God says He will be the Shepherd to His people:

“For thus says the Lord GOD: Behold, I, I myself will search for my sheep and will seek them out.12 As a shepherd seeks out his flock when he is among his sheep that have been scattered, so will I seek out my sheep, and I will rescue them from all places where they have been scattered on a day of clouds and thick darkness” (verses 11-12).

“I myself will be the shepherd of my sheep, and I myself will make them lie down, declares the Lord GOD. 16 I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, and the fat and the strong I will destroy. I will feed them in justice” (verses 15-16).

“And they shall know that I am the LORD their God with them, and that they, the house of Israel, are my people, declares the Lord GOD. 31 And you are my sheep, human sheep of my pasture, and I am your God, declares the Lord GOD” (verses 30-31).

Several of the prophets declare that God will send the Messiah, who will shepherd his sheep:

“I will rescue my flock; they shall no longer be a prey. And I will judge between sheep and sheep. 23 And I will set up over them one shepherd, my servant David, and he shall feed them: he shall feed them and be their shepherd. 24 And I, the LORD, will be their God, and my servant David shall be prince among them. I am the LORD; I have spoken” (Ezekiel 34:22-24).

“Thus says the LORD: “As the shepherd rescues from the mouth of the lion two legs, or a piece of an ear, so shall the people of Israel who dwell in Samaria be rescued, with the corner of a couch and part of a bed.

13 “Hear, and testify against the house of Jacob,”
declares the Lord GOD, the God of hosts,
14 “that on the day I punish Israel for his transgressions,
I will punish the altars of Bethel,
and the horns of the altar shall be cut off
and fall to the ground.
15 I will strike the winter house along with the summer house,
and the houses of ivory shall perish,
and the great houses shall come to an end,”
declares the LORD” (Amos 3:12-15).

“And he shall stand and shepherd his flock in the strength of the LORD,
in the majesty of the name of the LORD his God.
And they shall dwell secure, for now he shall be great
to the ends of the earth.
5 And he shall be their peace” (Micah 5:4-5).

Throughout the New Testament, Jesus Christ is referred to as the Shepherd of His people. Here’s a brief overview of those passages.

5 They told him, “In Bethlehem of Judea, for so it is written by the prophet:

 6 “‘And you, O Bethlehem, in the land of Judah,
are by no means least among the rulers of Judah;
for from you shall come a ruler
who will shepherd my people Israel” (Matthew 2:5-6).

 “When the Son of Man comes in his glory, and all the angels with him, then he will sit on his glorious throne. 32 Before him will be gathered all the nations, and he will separate people one from another as a shepherd separates the sheep from the goats. 33 And he will place the sheep on his right, but the goats on the left” (Matthew 25:31-33).

“Now may the God of peace who brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, the great shepherd of the sheep, by the blood of the eternal covenant, 21 equip you with everything good that you may do his will, working in us that which is pleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ, to whom be glory forever and ever. Amen” (Hebrews 13:19-21).

“He himself bore our sins in his body on the tree, that we might die to sin and live to righteousness. By his wounds you have been healed. 25 For you were straying like sheep, but have now returned to the Shepherd and Overseer of your souls” (I Peter 2:24-25).

“And when the chief Shepherd appears, you will receive the unfading crown of glory” (I Peter 5:4).

“They shall hunger no more, neither thirst anymore;

   the sun shall not strike them,
nor any scorching heat.
17 For the Lamb in the midst of the throne will be their shepherd,
and he will guide them to springs of living water,
and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes” (Revelation 7:16-17).

In John 10, Christ clearly refers to Himself as the Good Shepherd and cites that God gave Him this position:

1 “Truly, truly, I say to you, he who does not enter the sheepfold by the door but climbs in by another way, that man is a thief and a robber. 2 But he who enters by the door is the shepherd of the sheep. 3 To him the gatekeeper opens. The sheep hear his voice, and he calls his own sheep by name and leads them out. 4 When he has brought out all his own, he goes before them, and the sheep follow him, for they know his voice. 5 A stranger they will not follow, but they will flee from him, for they do not know the voice of strangers.” 6 This figure of speech Jesus used with them, but they did not understand what he was saying to them.

 7 So Jesus again said to them, “Truly, truly, I say to you, I am the door of the sheep. 8 All who came before me are thieves and robbers, but the sheep did not listen to them. 9 I am the door. If anyone enters by me, he will be saved and will go in and out and find pasture. 10 The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy. I came that they may have life and have it abundantly. 11 I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. 12 He who is a hired hand and not a shepherd, who does not own the sheep, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees, and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. 13 He flees because he is a hired hand and cares nothing for the sheep. 14 I am the good shepherd. I know my own and my own know me, 15 just as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep. 16 And I have other sheep that are not of this fold. I must bring them also, and they will listen to my voice. So there will be one flock, one shepherd. 17 For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life that I may take it up again. 18 No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father.”

I love this imagery of Christ as a Shepherd and find it comforting to know that He is caring for me. I wish I could develop this idea further, but again, the hour is late!

What do you think of this imagery? Is Jesus your shepherd and are you following Him as one of His sheep?

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2 thoughts on ““The Chief Shepherd”

  1. Pingback: Poor Shepherding to the Extreme: A Dismal Picture | Looking Unto Jesus

  2. Pingback: NT Shepherds | Looking Unto Jesus

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